Jumbo Behind the Nimbo

Photo Jun 26, 2 02 54 PM

Nimbostratus clouds in WCC’s “bowl”

Doing a citizen science project has taught me so much. I thought I knew a lot about clouds, but I was just skimming the surface. In my previous post, Hero or Villian?, I talked about how low clouds impact the climate and that, according to my observations, we saw more nimbostratus clouds. So I would like to go more into depth about those clouds. You’ll learn just how important they are like I did.

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Your World Cloaked in Fog

Since my last post, my group members and I have been working apart and focusing in on certain aspects of our projects. Personally I’ve been focusing on the GLOBE at Night project dealing with light pollution. The concept that captured my mind the most was looking at how light pollution affects a few places around the planet. I found some interesting things like: how Hong Kong is the worst place on the planet to go star gazing; in some places the pollution is so bad that it’s causing car accidents and long-term health issues; it could even go as far as harassing the mating season for some creatures; and in a little known desert peninsula you can see the Milky Way, itself, paint the sky in all new living color.

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A Storm Is Coming…

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Cumulus clouds on WCC’ campus

Have you ever participated in a citizen science project? In my last post– The Madness Behind the Mundane— I briefly mentioned the citizen science project that I’m currently working on called S’COOL Rover. This is something I’ve been doing with my two classmates Megan Martin and Josh Rim. For S’COOL Rover we have to observe the temperature and cloud type, height, cover, and visual opacity for a given time that the website produced for us once we signed up. Continue reading

Light Pollution: Affecting Present and Future Astronomers

This is a cartoon I created showing how light pollution is not just a problem for professional astronomers.

This is a cartoon I created showing how light pollution is not just a problem for professional astronomers.

Astronomers, professional and amateur, are making observations of stars and galaxies everyday, but how much will they be able to see? Light pollution is making it harder and harder for astronomers to do their job, observe! Today we are creating large amounts of light pollution in the world and it isn’t so easy to find a place where there is low enough light pollution to observe with as much accuracy as possible. This bothers astronomers! A lot! If only they could have a place closer to home to do their observing.  Continue reading

Squirrels and a Poem

In recent weeks I have been focused on a citizen science project, Project Squirrel. For this project me and two friends searched the Washtenaw Community College Campus for squirrels. If we to find squirrels we were supposed to take pictures of them and post them to the Project Squirrel website. I can’t reveal the results of our project you’ll just have to read my poem to find out how the project went. Continue reading

Our Galaxy’s Collision That We May Not See

This is a painting I drew of the Andromeda galaxy and Milky Way galaxy about to collide.

This is a painting I drew of the Andromeda galaxy and Milky Way galaxy about to collide.

It is told that in four billion years our galaxy, the Milky Way, is destined to collide with the Andromeda galaxy. Astronomers can see this happening and has calculated it based on what has been seen. Yet astronomers might have an easier time observing this astronomical event if light pollution wasn’t as big of a problem. Continue reading